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    Laoag (Laoag City) Ilocos Norte Province | Luzon Philippines























Click For Enlargment
Justin Taylan 2003

Location
Lat 18° 11' 56N Long 120° 35' 37E  Capital of Ilocos Norte Province. Also known as Loag, Laoang, Laoag City or Laog.

Wartime History
On December 10, 1941 the Japanese Army "Kanno Detachment" landed at Vigan and a column of troops and trucks began moving northward. On December 12, 1941 they occupy Laoag. Occupied by Japanese until 1945. During the war, the Kempi-Tai (Japanese Military Police) occupied the town hall. Governor-elect, Roque Ablan fled to Solsona, and organizes the resistance with provincial prison guards, civic minded citizens and Army reservists, collaborating with the USAFIP-NL (US Armed Forces in the Philippines - North Luzon), by January 1942 they have initiated their first guerilla action against the Japanese. In retaliation, the Japanese bombed towns and kill civilians.

The town was liberated on February 13, 1945 by the 1st Battalion of the 15th Infantry. As they fled, the Japanese destroyed part of the the Gibert Bridge over the Laoag River.

Gabu (Pias)
Coastal area near Laoag.

Laoag Airfield (Gabu)
Prewar airfield, occupied by the Japanese, liberated in in 1945 and used by Americans.

Gaang
Occupied by the Japanese in December 1941, and used as a secondary port facility in northern Luzon. Today, the Gaang is known as Currimao, the dock is used for commercial shipping and as a fuel depot for Shell.

Nestor Corpuz recalls:
"In the early 1950's there were two wrecked Japanese WWII shipwrecks at the far side of the harbor. They are gone today."

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Last Updated
September 11, 2018

 

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