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  P-38H-1-LO Lightning Serial Number 42-66522 Squadron Number 112
USAAF
5th AF
475th FG
431st FS

Pilot  2nd Lt William G. Seiber, O-797726 (survived)
Crashed  October 15, 1943
MACR  none

Aircraft History
Built by Lockheed Aircraft Corporation (LAC) in Burbank, California. Delivered to the U. S. Army. Disassembled and shipped overseas and reassembled.

Wartime History
Assigned to the 5th Air Force, 475th Fighter Group, 431st Fighter Squadron "Hades". Squadron Number 112. No known nickname or nose art.

Mission History
On October 15, 1943 took off from North Embi Airfield (Dobodura No. 12) piloted by 2nd Lt. William G. Seiber on a mission to intercept a 54 Japanese air raid attacking Oro Bay.

The enemy formation included 39 A6M Zeros from 201 Kokutai, 204 Kokutai and 253 Kokutai escorting 15 D3A Val dive bombers from 582 Kokutai attacking Oro Bay. During the air combat, Seiber claimed a Japanese aircraft shot down and was damaged himself and bailed out over the Solomon Sea.

Fate of the Pilot
Seiber was rescued and returned to duty.

References
431st Fighter Squadron History, frame 1754
431st Fighter Squadron, 475th Fighter Group "Subject: Narrative Combat Report" 16 October 1943
(page 2) "One plane, AC #42-66522. Sq. No. 112, piloted by 2nd Lt. Seiber failed to return. 'D' Battery, of the 102nd Coast Artillery, as well as 2/3 Battery (Aust.) reported that they had seen a plane heading in toward land from out over the sea; it made a 180° turn and headed back out over the water, crashing into Oro Bay about ten miles out from shore at a heading of 40°. This is believed to have been Lt. Seiber."
Japanese Naval Air Force Fighter Units And Their Aces 1932–1945 page 395 (pilots KIA), 432 (claims)
49th Fighter Group Aces of the Pacific page 66-67
“On the 15th [October 1943] all three of the group’s squadrons were in action when a large formation of Japanese aircraft were detected heading for Allied positions in New Guinea. The first to be scrambled were the P-40Ns of the 7th FS, closely followed by seven 9th FS P-38s, again led by Maj Johnson. But the fighters of the newly-formed 475th FG beat the latter unit into action, attacking alongside the 7th FS.”
Air Power History “Shootout at Rabaul” by Richard Dunn, page 20
“On the 15th [October 1943] the Japanese mounted an attack against American shipping sighted off the New Guinea coast. Thirty-nine Zeros escorted fifteen dive bombers of 582 Ku and ran into more than fifty P-38s and eight P-40s. The dive bombers were virtually annihilated and five Zeros also went down (American claims totaled 26 dive bombers and 18 fighters). Only one American fighter went down although others were hit including some damaged beyond repair.”

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Last Updated
February 4, 2018

 

Tech Info
P-38

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