Dennis Letourneau  Kula Gulf


As the Japanese tried to resupply troops on New Georgia by night, the US navy tried equally hard to stop them. Today the night battles are not as well known as the naval battles near Guadalcanal but were no less significant to the young men who fought them.

  Fishing vessel glides southward into the Kula Gulf between Kolombangara Island (on the left) and New Georgia.
 
nature
Kula Gulf

  One of mother nature's "aircraft carriers" patrols the Kula Gulf.

Dolphins head west from the Kula Gulf into the Blackett Strait. 56 years ago they might have bumped into John F. Kennedy, in PT-109.

Japanese Type 3 (1914) 140 mm Naval Gun The US destroyer �Strong� lies at the bottom of Kula Gulf, sunk by Japanese torpedoes during a night battle. As destroyers picked crew members out of the water in the black of night , Japanese shore guns fired on them. One of these shore guns at Enogai Point still aims out over Kula Gulf.

Japanese Type 3 (1914) 140 mm Naval Gun one of these shore guns at Enogai Point still aims out over Kula Gulf.

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